Physician Employment Opportunities

physician employement physician employement opportunities

If you are seeking for physician employment opportunities you may want to address the issue from a comprehensive point of view. There are many reasons why one would be looking for employment opportunities, starting with the obvious transition made after graduation. Other reasons may include the need to relocate closer to family, or because of your family’s needs; higher salary, better specialized programs, etc. Whatever the case may be, you may want to follow some of these guidelines:

-Network- talk to many people about your reason for seeking a new position. Do your research about those who either are in a position to open doors for you or know someone who may be. Definitely be engaged with the medical community both in person and through social media. Join professional associations that are relevant to the physician position you are seeking, and make a concerted effort to follow up with those you meet through networking. -Engage a headhunter- there are many qualified individuals who specialize in matching suitable candidates with open positions. Those physicians seeking employment opportunities would do well in identifying and enlisting the services of the most reputable headhunters in their fields. Usually headhunters will charge a fee to the hiring organization for their services, so contacting them is a good strategic decision for the job-seeker. -Research possible employers- there are many publications featuring the top medical facilities in the United States. Job seekers would do well in researching each institution that meets his or her requirements and inquiring about possible job opportunities. Although many healthcare institutions will post their job openings online, more specific and hard-to-fill positions may not be open to the public, but rather filled based on recommendations. This is why researching the employer, along with networking (see above) is incredibly important to keep options open.

If you are just starting in the medical field, remain open to opportunities that may not be your ideal position, but will give you some practical experience. Whenever pursuing a position don’t limit yourself from exploring all your options; it may be that a less than desirable location can be compensated with an excellent benefits packet or training in a very specific kind of medical practice. At this point in your career building experience may pay off with interest in the future. Also true for those starting out in their medical careers is the importance of building strong relationships with the places in which they did their residency years or any internship. It is always possible to inquire about permanent staff positions at these places based on prior performance. Apart from all the tips outlined above, those seeking physician employment opportunities may want to consult with online sites such as www.docswanted.com that act as search engines where targeted job opportunities are aggregated and available all in one place. This excellent resource is easily organized to make the job search incredibly simple and streamlined.


What Factors Influence Job Satisfaction

Pay:

Although just about everyone wants a job that pays well, pay is not as important to most people as one might think. Participants in a survey done by the Society of Human Resource Management found that pay was only the third-most important job happiness factor, with only 57 percent of survey participants naming it among their top choices.

Job Security:

More than pay, most people want to know their job is secure and feel more satisfaction at work if they are confident it is. Sixty-three percent of workers in the Society of Human Resource Management survey said job security was important, making it the top job happiness factor. A study commissioned by the American Business Collaboration also found that job security was the top job satisfaction factor among men under 40 who held non-salaried jobs.

Benefits:

Benefits are another important job satisfaction factor that have universal appeal. Benefits ranked second in the Society of Human Resource Management study, with 60 percent of participants listing them as a top job satisfaction factor. Benefits were also the top factor in job happiness for non-salaried women of all ages and for non-salaried men over 40 in the American Business Collaboration study.

Opportunities:

In addition to good pay and benefits, most workers want opportunities, either to advance up the pay scale or to be get additional training and learn new skills. Opportunities ranked as the fourth-most important job satisfaction factor in the Society of Human Resource Management study, with 55 percent of respondents listing it as a top factor. In the American Business Collaboration study, salaried male workers under 30 named opportunities for advancement as their top job happiness factor, while salaried women over 40 said their top factor was the opportunity to learn and grow.

Work-Life Balance:

Another top job satisfaction factor for many workers is the ability to strike a balance between work and home life. In the American Business Collaboration study, salaried women in their 30s cited work/life balance as their top job satisfaction survey, while salaried men in their 30s cited a flexible work schedule as their top factor. These results may reflect the needs of working parents.